Below is a listing of courses typically offered at CanIL or one of our on-campus partners during the summer semester that are part of training tracks or degree programs. Be sure to confirm with your degree advisor or with Anita at admissions@canil.ca that a course is confirmed as being offered.

Note that LING courses are offered by CanIL unless TESOL courses. All other courses are offered by other on-campus partners.

BIB-500 Intro to Bible 2 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

An introduction to biblical studies in the seminary setting, designed to deepen the student’s overall understanding of the biblical literature and to provide an orientation to the disciplines of graduate-level biblical research. The course includes an overview of the documents of Christian Scripture, considering structure, content, major themes, literary forms, chronology, 1st century historical-cultural setting, composition, and canonical interrelationship. It also exposes the student to key issues and prominent schools of thought in biblical research, and seeks to enhance the student’s own competence in the skills of biblical study.

BIB-505 Biblical Hermeneutics 3 Sem. Hours Spring, Summer

This course focuses on the development of a systematic approach to the interpretation of Scripture. Although reference is made to various interpretative systems and strategies, special attention is given to the historical-grammatical method. The predominant literary genres of the Bible are examined and relevant principles of interpretation highlighted. Emphasis is placed on understanding the original, intended meaning of Scripture in its canonical context as the basis upon which to prepare expositions and make appropriate contemporary applications.

Prerequisite: BIE 500 or equivalent.

BOT/BNT-501 Hebrew I / Greek I 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

BOT-501: This course constitutes the first half of an introduction to the elements of Hebrew grammar, with an emphasis on morphology, phonology, parsing, vocabulary building, reading, and translation of simple sentences.

BNT-501: The student is introduced to the basic features of New Testament Greek, including grammar, vocabulary, and oral reading. The result is the ability to read the simpler portions of the New Testament with the aid of a Greek Lexicon.

BOT/BNT-502 Hebrew II / Greek II 3 Sem. Hours Spring, Summer

BOT-502: This course constitutes the second half of an introduction to the elements of Hebrew grammar, and includes coverage of the remaining paradigms, development of parsing skills, and an introduction to the basics of syntax. By the end of the course, the student should be able to translate selected portions of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of a lexicon and to parse regular verb forms.

BNT-502: The student continues in the basic features of NT Greek, with emphasis on some of the more complex aspects of Greek grammar. Vocabulary development and reading practice will be emphasized. As a result the student will gain proficiency in reading the Greek Testament and will be prepared for exegetical study.

LIN-696 MLE Comprehensive Exam 0 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer

In order to graduate, students who pursue the non-thesis option must receive a grade of P (Pass) on written comprehensive exams.

LING-210 Language and Society 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer

This course focuses on the interaction between language and the social context within which it is used. Topics include: regional and social dialects; multilingualism; language attitudes and their impact on national and personal identity; linguistic politeness; the maintenance, shift, loss, and spread of languages; and the impact of modern technology. Applications to gender and education are explored in depth.

This course can alternatively be taken in an online format. Refer to Language and Society ONLINE.

LING-210 Language and Society – ONLINE VERSION 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer

This online course focuses on the interaction between language and the social context within which it is used. Topics include: regional and social dialects; multilingualism; language attitudes and their impact on national and personal identity; linguistic politeness; the maintenance, shift, loss, and spread of languages; and the impact of modern technology. Applications to gender and education are explored in depth.

This course can alternatively be taken in the standard classroom format.

LING-301 TESOL Volunteer Practicum 1 Sem. Hour Fall, Spring, Summer

This semester of classroom experience provides opportunities for students to link their TESL courses to school settings. Students volunteer in an ESL classroom in order to become more confident in the classroom, interacting with students and teachers, and carrying out activities that prepare them for the 400 level practicum.

LING-305 The Grammar of English for TESOL 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

This course examines the structure, function, and usage of English grammar within the context of language teaching. LING 305 is a foundational course for further studies in the TESOL certificate program.

LING-310 Articulatory Phonetics 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer

This course provides a theoretical and practical introduction to the broad range of human speech sounds that are found in the languages of the world. Through practice inside and outside of the classroom, students will learn to recognize and produce the various sounds, transcribe them with phonetic symbols, and describe how they are produced. Attention will also be given to other phonetic details such as tone, intonation, stress, and duration.

LING-330 Phonological Analysis 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer

Theory of language sound systems, principles of analysis of sound systems, and principles of forming an orthography. Opportunity will be given to apply these principles to a wide range of natural language data.

Co-requisites:

LING 310 Articulatory Phonetics

LING-360 Morphosyntax I 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

This course deals with theories of grammar and principles of language analysis: morphology, syntax, stems, words, phrases and sentences. Problem solving with data from a variety of languages is a major part of the course.

Co-requisites:

LING 310 Articulatory Phonetics

LING 330 Phonological Analysis

LING-401 TESOL Teaching Practicum 1 Sem. Hour Fall, Spring, Summer

In this final course in the TESOL certificate, students spend a minimum of 25 hours in an approved ESL/ EFL program. Students utilize knowledge and skills learned in TESOL courses, learn to reflect on their classroom practices, and begin to articulate how their faith influences their classroom presence.

LING-460 Morphosyntax II 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

This course explores the rich variety of syntactic and semantic structures found in human language, deepening the students’ understanding of syntactic phenomena addressed in the prerequisite course (360). The topics are examined within the framework of a current theory of Syntax.

Prerequisites:

LING 210 Language and Society

LING 310 Articulatory Phonetics

LING 330 Phonological Analysis

LING 360 Morphosyntax I

LING-466 Principles of Sociolinguistic Survey 3 Sem. Hours Summer

This course introduces the students to the rudiments of linguistic and sociolinguistic survey. The focus is on purpose-driven language survey design and appropriate subsequent reporting of the findings. Consideration is given to current issues in social science research such as the ethics of sampling, and statistical significance of sample populations.

LING-475 Scripture Engagement 3 Sem. Hours Summer

This course focuses on developing appropriate materials and activities that enhance a community’s engagement with Scripture. Students learn how to research worldview, work with local artists and teachers, and partner with local leaders in this process.

LING-481 Anthropological Linguistics: Ethnography 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer

This course introduces crucial concepts in anthropology and ethnography to linguists. It focuses on cross-cultural communication with an emphasis on participant observation as an effective methodology for such research. Students will collect and analyze data related to topics such as oral traditions, kinship, and social structure. They will be introduced to various tools for ethno-semantic analysis, including analysis of cultural themes and worldview, semantic domain analysis, and taxonomic analysis.

Prerequisites:

LING 210 Language and Society

LING-483 Language Programs Design & Management – ONLINE VERSION 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

This course investigates the sociolinguistic and background factors upon which a language development program for speakers of vernacular languages may be based. Students learn to work with local people and agencies in designing and implementing a program to effectively meet the needs of specific language groups.

Prerequisites:

LING 210 Language and Society

LING-484 Principles of Literacy 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

As an introductory course in principles for literacy work in ethnolinguistic minority groups, this course includes an introduction to what a literacy program involves, including orthography design, pre and post- literacy considerations, learning and reading theory and instructional methodologies. It requires a background knowledge of phonology.

Prerequisites:

LING 310 Articulatory Phonetics

LING 330 Phonological Analysis

LING-485 Principles of Translation 3 Sem. Hours Spring, Summer

This course covers the process of translating from a source language to a target language. Students will develop skill in understanding a message as originally communicated in one language and cultural setting, and in communicating essentially that message in a very different language and culture. Discussion includes source language, target language, and cross-language transfer, with particular attention to the translation of Scripture.

Prerequisites:

LING 480 Field Methods: Data Management & Analysis

LING 460 Morphosyntax II

LING 470 Language and Culture Acquisition: Theory & Praxis

LING-513 Sociolinguistics 3 Sem. Hours Spring, Summer

Students will develop an understanding for Sociolinguistics and be able to use principles of ethnography for classroom needs assessment. The course is taught in collaborative teams; at various stages, students are responsible for readings, lectures, and teaching their peers. Sociolinguistics begins with an overview of “classic” Sociolinguistics (e.g., language and dialect, pidgins and creoles, diglossia and multilingualism, social stratification, language and gender, language change, mainenance and death, etc.). Following that, the course focuses on ethnography (participant observation, domains and semantic relationships, multiculturalism in the classroom, the ethnographic interview, etc.), and in particular, the application of ethnographic observation principles to second language teaching.

LING-560 Morphosyntax II 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

This course explores the rich variety of syntactic and semantic structures found in human language, deepening the students’ understanding of syntactic phenomena addressed in the prerequisite course (360). The topics are examined within the framework of a current theory of Syntax.

Prerequisites:

LING 360 Morphosyntax I

LING-566 Principles of Sociolinguistic Survey 3 Sem. Hours Summer

This course introduces the students to the rudiments of linguistic and sociolinguistic survey. The focus is on purpose-driven language survey design and appropriate subsequent reporting of the findings. Consideration is given to current issues in social science research such as the ethics of sampling, and statistical significance of sample populations.

Co-requisites:

LING 210 Language and Society

LING 310 Articulatory Phonetics

LING-575 Scripture Engagement 3 Sem. Hours Summer

This course focuses on literature use as the goal of a language development project. The course is designed to create an early awareness of the interrelated parameters of literature use, its timing in language development planning, and the logistics of promotion and distribution. Topics covered include: culture variation and cross-cultural communication, the role of religion in culture, literacy strategies, promotion and distribution methods and strategies, and the role of non-print media. A few workshop sessions may be planned upon request for those already involved in a language program. Participants with sufficient field data and/or experience may work on their own data/projects for the class assignments, in consultation with the instructor.

LING-581 Anthropological Linguistics: Ethnography 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer

This course introduces crucial concepts in anthropology and ethnography to linguists. It focuses on cross-cultural communication with an emphasis on participant observation as an effective methodology for such research. Students will collect and analyze data related to topics such as oral traditions, kinship, and social structure. They will be introduced to various tools for ethno-semantic analysis, including analysis of cultural themes and worldview, semantic domain analysis, and taxonomic analysis. Pre-requisite: LING 210 Language and Society or equivalent introduction to sociolinguistics.

Prerequisites:

LING 210 Language and Society

LING-583 Language Programs Design & Management – ONLINE VERSION 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

This course investigates the sociolinguistic and background factors upon which a language development program for speakers of vernacular languages may be based. Students learn to work with local people and agencies in designing and implementing a program to effectively meet the needs of specific language groups.

Prerequisites:

LING 210 Language and Society

LING-584 Principles of Literacy 3 Sem. Hours Fall, Summer

This course covers principles involved in the introduction of literacy to ethno-linguistic minority groups. It includes orthography design, consideration of socio-historical issues, strategies for literacy programs, stimulation of local authorship, reading theory and instructional methodologies, and a literacy tutorial practicum. Under certain conditions a term paper may be substituted for the practicum.

LING-585 Principles of Translation 3 Sem. Hours Spring, Summer

This course covers the process of translating from a source language to a target language. Students will develop skill in understanding a message as originally communicated in one language and cultural setting, and in communicating essentially that message in a very different language and culture. Discussion includes source language, target language, and cross-language transfer, with particular attention to the translation of Scripture.

Prerequisites:

LING-LIN 560 Morphosyntax II

LING-LIN 570 Language and Culture Acquisition

LING-LIN 580 Field Methods: Data Management & Analysis

LING-696 MA LING Comprehensive Exam Fall, Spring, Summer

In order to graduate, students who pursue the non-thesis option must receive a grade of P (Pass) on written comprehensive exams.

LING-699 Linguistics Continuing Registration 0 Sem. Hours. Fall, Spring, Summer

The student works on their thesis under the direction of an advisor. Course enrollment tracks the student’s continuing status in the program and must be enrolled in until final thesis completion. Prerequisite: LING 697 and LING 698

Fee: $955/SP, FA. $450/SU.

MLE-831 Linguistics Thesis I 2 Sem. Hour Fall, Spring, Summer

The student works on their thesis under the direction of an advisor. Prerequisite: MLE 803 Thesis Seminar and a Program Committee-approved thesis proposal.

MLE-832 Linguistics Thesis II 3 Sem. Hour Fall, Spring, Summer

The student works on their thesis under the direction of an advisor. Prerequisite: MLE 831.

Fee: $150

 

MLE-834 Continuing Status 0 Sem. Hour Fall, Spring, Summer

The student works on their thesis under the direction of an advisor. Course enrollment tracks the student’s continuing status in the program and must be enrolled in until final thesis completion. Prerequisite: MLE 833.

Fee: $450/semester

RES 500 Research Strategies 2 Sem. Hours Fall, Spring, Summer
THS-540 Intro to Theology 2 Sem. Hours Spring, Summer

An introduction to the study of theology, this course provides an overview of major theological themes and issues, set in the context of a brief survey of the historical development of Christian doctrine. We will discuss the basis, purpose, and essential language of theology together with its place and importance in the life of the church. Designed especially (though not exclusively) for students who have no background in formal theological study, this class lays a foundation for other theological courses in the ACTS curriculum.

THS-571 Introduction to Believers Church Theology 3 Sem. Hours Spring, Summer

This Course introduces the student to Believers’ Church theology. It begins with a study of the nature and necessity of doing theology in the contemporary world with primary attention given to the authority of God’s self-disclosure in Scripture, as well as discussions regarding hermeneutical issues from within a Believers’ Church perspective. The subject matter then concludes with a consideration of the nature, ministry, and mission of the church in the world.

Prerequisite: THS 540 or its equivalent.